My Nana - her legacy.

Nana, a few years ago, with baby Glory

Sunday night I banged out a quick blog post and mentioned a line or two about the amazing women in my life. It was a large and lovely thought in my head, but just a blip or two in this online space. My days here in Charleston have been filled with my family women - my mom, my two sisters, and my Nana, Betty. My real life friends have all heard at least one funny story each of Nana. If we're really close, I've probably sent you a video of her being her cute self. Nana was one of the best parts of us moving to Charleston. My mom has worked tirelessly taking care of her the past few years and I was excited to be around to help mom with that, but also just to be with Nana again. 

Sunday night, Cannon, my Mom and Glory and I popped into visit her and she seemed okay. Weary, but ok. Tired and worn out, but still so gracious. She thanked my mom probably three times while we were there for how well she takes care of her. She cooed at Cannon and listened to Glory talk. Glor is actually so much like Nana - Mom and I laughed as we walked out about how funny it is to hear the two of them talk to each other. Both effervescent and passionate and both moving through topics like fast little traincars passing you at a stoplight. 

Nana went to sleep that night and woke up the next morning with Jesus. When I got to the hospital the next morning, I saw my sisters and mom sitting in a consultation room and heard the news they'd already been processing. We sat together and cried and laughed a little and went to say bye to Nana Banana. So much of what happened that day felt ordinary and sacred and beautiful and hard all melted into one big ball and so much of it feels too private to share, because words could never describe it. But I'll say this - I will never ever forget my Mama standing over the human shell that had held her Mama, then bursting into song to praise our Jesus. 




I just said two little lines the other day, but the truth is - I don't have enough words to capture the gratefulness I have for the legacy of the women in my family. My Nana taught us volumes about living in her dying. My Mom has taught me books and books full about worshipping in her sorrow. For years and years, I've heard women tell me "I wish your Sister/Mom/Nana was my Sister/Mom/Nana" and I won't deny it. 
My sisters and Mom and Nana are the best there are.

The truth is, though, I don't think any of them spend too much time thinking about legacy or how they're perceived. They just love people really hard and well. They're all a little crazy in the best way. They're all usually busy, with hands full and schedules bleeding off the page. These women, they don't sit down a lot. Their first thoughts when they wake are rarely of themselves. They're not quiet or super cautious and they keep you on your toes. But they are leaving a legacy in their wake that is changing the communities around them and the Kingdom of God for the absolute better. They are intent on wringing God's glory out of every moment and day. They're my women and I am so glad to be living among them and learning from them. 

And that Nana was leading the charge with her smiles and funny stories and promises of peanut butter balls and pecan pies. And I want to be just like her. 

And my takeaway is this. If you've ever wanted to leave a legacy, just do it. Don't think too much about leaving a legacy and think a lot about others. Think a lot about the Lord and what He wants from your days and just love hard. Start now - speaking life and encouraging and blessing others and don't stop till the sun sets on your last day. 
Wring your life out for God's glory starting today.